Beef Ribs

SuckleBusters Beef Ribs

By: Darrin Williams
Beef Ribs

Ingredients:

1 rack of Beef Ribs (5 - 10 lbs)

2 TBSP Mustard (or binder of your choice)

SuckleBusters SPG, and 1836 Beef Rub 

A spray bottle with apple cider vinegar for spritzing

Pink Butcher Paper


Untrimmed Beef Ribs

 

Preparation: 

1. Remove ribs from packaging and pat dry with a paper towel. 


2. Trim away the fat cap. Typically on beef ribs, the fat cap is hard fat, which inhibits rub and smoke penetration. Look for the more significant, hard, and thick sections of fat - remove those.


3. There is no need to remove the membrane on beef ribs as it helps keep the meat on the bones during the cooking process.


4. Use 1- 2 TBSP of mustard and coat both sides of the ribs. Apply a medium layer of SPG Rub, followed by a medium coating of 1836 Beef Rub. Remember to season the edges of the ribs as well.


5. Allow the ribs to rest while you bring the smoker up to cooking temperature.  


Trimmed Beef Ribs

Trimmed and Seasoned Beef Ribs

 

Cooking: 

1. Preheat the smoker to 250º using the wood of your choice. We prefer Oak and Hickory.


2. Place the ribs on the smoker.


3. Check the ribs in about 2 hours, you should notice some pullback starting on the bones, and you may see dry spots on the meat. Lightly mist the dry areas apple cider vinegar.


4. Check and spritz every hour until a crust or "external bark" has formed on the ribs, typically when the internal temperature of the meat reaches between 165º-180º.


Optional Step: Wrap the ribs in pink butcher paper when the internal temperature of the meat reaches 180º.


5. Resume cooking, checking for doneness by inserting a meat probe in the meaty area between the bones. If there is no resistance and the probe goes in like "hot butter," the ribs are done, typically at about 203º.


Hint: A typical cook is anywhere to 6 hours but can take over 8 hours, depending on fire management and cook temps. 


7. Rest the ribs wrapped in pink butcher paper for an hour.


8. After resting, slice and serve. You'll understand why we call beef ribs - "Brisket on a Bone". Enjoy!  


Ribs and pink butcher paper

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